• The Nordelta community in Buenos Aires, Argentina is a wealthy gated community built on natural wetlands.
  • The capybaras invaded the community with environmentalists saying they were just going home.
  • They are now at the center of a bitter environmental debate.

In Argentina, a rich closed community has been invaded by unexpected visitors: the largest rodents in the world, the capybaras.

Located in the capital Buenos Aires, Nordelta’s manicured lawns have been occupied by rampaging capybaras munching on grass, attacking dogs and pooping wherever they choose, the local newspaper La Nacion reports.

Rodents are approximately 39 to 51 inches in length and weigh 60 to 174 pounds (27 to 79 kilograms), according to National Geographic.

Conservationists say the influx of dog-sized rodents shouldn’t come as a shock, as the neighborhood’s luxury homes have been built next to wetlands. Some animals come back to find what they once knew.

Argentine environmental lawyer and conservationist Enrique Viale said we should not see capybaras – known as “carpinchos” in Argentina – as invading areas.

“It’s the other way around: Nordelta has invaded the carpinchos ecosystem”, Viale told the Guardian.

“Wealthy, government-backed real estate developers must destroy nature to sell clients the dream of living in nature – because the people who buy these homes want nature, but without mosquitoes, snakes or carpinchos,” he said. he added.

“Nordelta is the oversized paradigm of closed communities built on wetlands. The first thing it does is remove the absorbent function of the earth, so when there are extreme weather events, the surrounding poorest neighborhoods end up being inundated. As always, it is the poor who end up paying the price. “

Many people consider Viale, with a person tweeting “My support for the Peronist capybaras of Nordelta in the process of reclaiming their habitat.”

In addition to the support, a person responded “The capybara revolution !!”

The Parana wetlands cover much of the country, from northern Argentina to the Plate River and the Atlantic Ocean, but they are diminishing as developers take the land to build on and for livestock farms and soy.

In 2020, the vast wetlands were engulfed in flames due to cattle ranching, drought and soaring temperatures.



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